ad infinitum

Mathematics is as much an aspect of culture as it is a collection of algorithms.   ~Carl Boyer~

One of the things I admire about the teaching staff I work with and lead is their willingness to take risks and adapt. I think it’s really important that kids spend their time with adults who care about them and have a high expectations; and these two concepts are not mutually exclusive. We are well under way on our journey of school-wide transformation in math teaching and learning and are at the point where those ‘pockets of practice’ that were evident in some classes are now evident in all our classes. Parents are seeing their children using models and strategies that seem strange and unusual to them and we are getting questions, lots of questions.

Most of the questions or concerns we hear are based upon the lack of understanding of how mathematics teaching has changed over the past 20 years and how these changes have been received by parents and the general population. Part of my job as principal is to help people understand our practice and our pedagogy so let me try to address a few of these concerns:

  • ‘The New Math’  There is no ‘new math’. Math is the language we use to understand and describe the patterns, relationships and characteristics of our universe.This language is expressed using numbers and symbols that have remained constant for thousands of years and will remain so as long as the fundamental physics of our universe remain the same. We can use a lot of terms to describe math, but new is not one them folks. The emphasis in mathematics has always been on understanding number patterns and relationships to think and reason, this is far from a new phenomenon.
  • So What is New? Over the past 30 years a few things have changed where it concerns education; in math and all other disciplines. We now expect that schools will ensure that all students meet a high standard of literacy and mathematical understanding (see Employability Skills Index), In addition, research into the neurological, psychological, and sociological factors around learning have had a profound impact on the pedagogy and teaching practices of teachers. In other words, we know we are capable of, even though we may not all be capable of it yet.
  • The ‘Real Basics’ Often, parents struggle to understand the diversity of models and strategies that our teachers are introducing and question why we aren’t teaching the basics. By basics they usually mean things like the standard procedures for addition, subtraction, multiplication and division- also called algorithms. Anyone who has tried to actually explain the algorithm for long division without using tricks or vampire analogies (just what is a goezinta anyway?) knows that an algorithm is anything but ‘basic’. The real basics are the numbers, and our emphasis on helping students understand our number system using models and strategies that make sense to them allow them to use mathematics in its truest form; a powerful, logical language for solving problems and communicating rather than a set of clever tricks and short cuts. If a child doesn’t understand the numbers they are working with, they don’t know the math. It is also important to note that since they are culturally based, there are actually many algorithms, more than those of us who experienced a western education can even fathom.

Across our school, we are working together as a team of educators to better understand and teach our curriculum in a way that will enable all our students to become mathematically capable. Not an easy task but ultimately a worthy one. At its core, mathematics is a language that is expressed using numbers- the beauty of which is the infinite nature of these numbers, not unlike the infinite capacity of our students.

  1. Jelley, Heather
    November 16, 2014 at 11:35 am

    Love it! You are so explicit in the way you talk about math. You open the connecting doors to math thinking, learning and understanding. Thank you:0)

    Heather Jelley Elementary Mathematics Consultant The Centre for Leadership and Learning 300 Harry Walker Parkway South Newmarket, ON, L3Y 8E2 905-727-0022 Ext. 3311

    “It’s not what you look at that matters. It’s what you see.” Henry David Thoreau

    “All I ever really needed to know I learned in kindergarten.” Robert Fulghum

    From: The Open Office <comment-reply@wordpress.com> Reply-To: The Open Office <comment+edn8hpmrzmlrtqtiazhs-k@comment.wordpress.com> Date: Friday, November 14, 2014 at 6:15 PM To: “Jelley, Heather” <heather.jelley@yrdsb.ca> Subject: [New post] ad infinitum

    Brian Harrison posted: “Mathematics is as much an aspect of culture as it is a collection of algorithms. ~Carl Boyer~ http://www.thersa.org/events/rsashorts/rsa-shorts-how-to-find-your-element One of the things I admire about the teaching staff I work with and lead is thei”

  1. December 14, 2014 at 10:46 am
  2. January 13, 2015 at 5:59 am

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