Home > 21st Century Learning, Mathematics > Another Brick in the Wall

Another Brick in the Wall

“Mathematics is not a careful march down a well-cleared highway, but a journey into a strange wilderness, where the explorers often get lost.”        ~ W.S. Anglin ~

mathwall

Our supply of those rolls of brown craft paper are depleting rapidly here at Park Avenue PS and with good reason. Over the past year we have looked deeply into the structures and design of our classroom learning environments to ensure they reflect the best practices of universal design for learning and have a degree coherence and consistency across the grades. As a result, one might notice now that our K-8 classroom environments share some common characteristics such as desks or tables arranged in groups to support students working in teams and more open floor space, learning tools and materials stored in a more accessible manner and an intentional use of the walls as visual supports for learning.

Traditionally, classroom walls have been used to display completed student work, more often than not student art work, or written pieces completed by all the students, While the intention to acknowledge and celebrate tasks that have been completed is noble, the question that begs to be asked is how does displaying learning that has already happened  help a student who is struggling with what is being learned now? Rather than being a static archive of what has been learned, the walls of the effective classroom need to be an evolving, active documentation of what is being learned.

Education researchers refer to the use of charts and images showing the learning goals, components of a successful task and anchor charts showing the meaning of the strategies and terminology; as essential components of an effective classroom- or ‘high yield’ teaching approaches. And this, is where the rolls of craft paper have become so helpful.

One of our highly experienced Special Education Teachers, Anita Simpson, is creating, along with her students, a Math Wall (it literally fills a wall) that represents the key Big Ideas, Models and Strategies from the Mathematics Landscape of Learning she and her students are exploring. As you can see in the photo above, the wall shows a record of the strategies that students have learned and will need to use along with the models and ideas that connect with these strategies. In Anita’s class, students can be seen glancing at the wall to check the meaning of terms, remind them of strategies or to explore the relationships between the ideas, models and strategies. The wall serves as an anchor chart and road map that is visible for all.

With exception of the ideas, strategies and models labels, the wall was blank in September. Together with her students, Anita has carefully documented the learning on the wall-it’s an impressive sight. So impressive that similar walls are popping up in classrooms all over the school.

Over my 2 plus years as principal at Park Avenue I have stressed the importance for us to develop a set of coherent, common practices in mathematics teaching to support student learning. Mathematics is at it’s core a language; and tools like Anita’s math wall allow our students to immerse themselves in this language while they are engaged in meaningful problem solving- which is the core of a comprehensive math program.

More craft paper, anyone?

  1. No comments yet.
  1. No trackbacks yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: